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Archive for the ‘1964 Wilderness Act’ Category

Ranger Art Seamans with Tag and Percy. Moose Creek, July 1975

Ranger Art Seamans with Tag and Percy. Moose Creek, July 1975

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Episode 44 (15:40)

Thank you for joining us for the forty-fourth episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. This episode, titled “Diplomacy” illustrates the ways in which rangers worked to define wilderness policy by educating users of wilderness in order to give them an experience in an unrestrained area and yet maintain the pristine nature of this special place.

Art Seamans worked as the Ranger at Moose Creek from 1975-1980. He describes living with his family in a fourteen foot tent for two years so that another family with young children could use the ranger’s house. His daughter, Cindy Schacher has also worked as an archaeologist and historian in the Selway-Bitterroot area.

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Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

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Episode 41 (32:06)

Thank you for joining us for the forty-first episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. In this episode, titled “Thirty Miles from Paradise,” we take a look at the community that exists in the Moose Creek Ranger Station. Located deep in the heart of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Moose Creek has housed Forest Service employees, work crews, volunteers, outfitters, visitors, and celebrities. Because it can only be accessed by airplane or thirty miles of non-vehicle trail, Moose Creek Ranger Station tends to foster tight communities within the people who live and work there each season. From the early days of the Forest Service in the 1920’s and 30’s, to the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964, to the present day when the Selway-Bitterroot Foundation organizes volunteer crews to maintain the trails and manage fires, Moose Creek has been one of the central heartbeats of the Selway-Bitterroot area. The various comments presented in this podcast about living and working at Moose Creek give a small glimpse of this unique place.

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Jane Holman, 2011

Jane Holman, 2011

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Episode 40 (15:31)

Thank you for joining us for the fortieth episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. In this episode, titled “Re-wilding,” Jane Holman describes some of the practical aspects of returning settled sections of the Selway-Bitterroot country to wilderness.

Jane graduated from the University of Montana after growing up in Dixie, Idaho. She spent the years of 1968-1972 at Moose Creek Ranger Station with her husband, Bill Holman, who was the wilderness ranger there. From there, she moved to Washington, DC and spent 29 years working for the U.S. Department of Education, although she always revisited her Idaho roots. After retirement in 2004, she returned to Moscow, Idaho. Among other pursuits, she serves as the secretary for the Selway-Bitterroot Foundation and remains active in stewarding the wilderness, both politically and on the ground.

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Sign marking the boundary of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

Sign marking the boundary of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

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Episode 39 (08:47)

Thank you for joining us for the thirty-ninth episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. This episode, titled “40th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act” is a radio broadcast produced in September of 2004 by NPR’s Morning Edition. Included are interviews of Doris Milner, Dave Campbell and Dennis Baird. For more information, contact NPR.org.

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Dennis Baird in front of Elk Mountain. Photo courtesy Eric Barker/Lewiston Morning Tribune

Dennis Baird in front of Elk Mountain. Photo courtesy Eric Barker/Lewiston Morning Tribune

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Episode 36 (9:33)

Thank you for joining us for the thirty-sixth episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled “Wilderness Boundaries,” Dennis Baird, the co-leader for the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project, talks about his view of what a wilderness boundary represents, both physically and ideologically.

Dennis Baird attended Michigan State University and the University of Hawaii, and obtained graduate degrees from the University of Michigan and Michigan State University, where he witnessed the very first Earth Day in Ann Arbor. While in high school and college, he traveled extensively in Europe and Southeast Asia, as well as serving for a year in Vietnam. When he finished school, he taught at Southern Illinois University and became involved in conservation, helping to establish the first wilderness area in Illinois: Crab Orchard Wilderness. After moving to Idaho in 1974 to work at the University of Idaho Library, Dennis joined the conservation efforts in establishing both the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. In addition to pursuing his passions for historical preservation at the UI Library, and fine wine at his locally owned business, The Wine Company in Moscow, Dennis continues to advocate for wilderness protection in Idaho.

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Bill Worf and his daughter, Gloria (Worf) Owen in October, 2011 at a USFS ceremony.

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Episode 22 (7:52)

Thank you for joining us for the twenty-second episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled “Defining Wilderness,” Bill Worf, a tireless wilderness champion and lifelong conservationist, tells us in one of his last interviews about his passion for wilderness.

Although Bill passed on December 21, 2011, his legacy will be remembered as long as wilderness survives in this country. He spent his long life working to establish and preserve wilderness as a special, set-aside place where people were not allowed to interfere with Mother Nature. Bill was born in 1926 in Reed Point, Montana, was raised on a ranch near Rosebud during the Great Depression, fought in World War II in Iwo Jima, and then obtained his Bachelor of Science in Forestry in 1950 in Missoula. When the 1964 Wilderness Act was passed, Bill was assigned to Washington DC to lead the wilderness program, and his influence and interpretation were the guiding forces behind the wilderness fire policy of allowing naturally-occurring wildfire to burn, as well as the strict one-launch-per-day river policy, and the use of primitive non-motorized tools by trail maintenance crews.

After retiring from the Forest Service, Bill and his colleagues founded Wilderness Watch, a non-profit organization dedication to maintaining the Wilderness Act in its entirety. As Bill said, “I shall not perish from this earth without doing everything within my realm to save its most precious non-human resource.”

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Warren Miller, 2010

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Episode 19 (12:09)

Thank you for joining us for the nineteenth episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled “Managing Wilderness Is An Oxymoron,” Warren Miller explains how the wilderness rangers helped to interpret the Wilderness Act in a practical, tangible way, by educating backcountry recreational users and promoting primitive tool use, among other things.

Warren Miller was born in Salt Lake City, lived there until he was eleven, and then his family moved to Phoenix, Arizona. He attended Reed College in Portland where he majored in physics. After graduating, and spending some time traveling in Europe, he and his brother took a work trip with the Sierra Club, which took them into the Selway-Bitterroot off of Elk Summit. While on that trip, he was impressed with the country and its surroundings; he also met Dick Walker, who encouraged him to apply for a job as wilderness ranger. In his words, “I figured well, I’ll try this for a year or for a season and I stayed there 20 years.”

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