Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Bruce Farling’ Category

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

Play Podcast (click Play button):

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Episode 41 (32:06)

Thank you for joining us for the forty-first episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. In this episode, titled “Thirty Miles from Paradise,” we take a look at the community that exists in the Moose Creek Ranger Station. Located deep in the heart of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Moose Creek has housed Forest Service employees, work crews, volunteers, outfitters, visitors, and celebrities. Because it can only be accessed by airplane or thirty miles of non-vehicle trail, Moose Creek Ranger Station tends to foster tight communities within the people who live and work there each season. From the early days of the Forest Service in the 1920’s and 30’s, to the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964, to the present day when the Selway-Bitterroot Foundation organizes volunteer crews to maintain the trails and manage fires, Moose Creek has been one of the central heartbeats of the Selway-Bitterroot area. The various comments presented in this podcast about living and working at Moose Creek give a small glimpse of this unique place.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Continue Reading (without disrupting audio playback) » | (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Bruce Farling, 2011

Play Podcast (click Play button):

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Episode 28 (13:23)

Thank you for joining us for the twenty-eighth episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled, “Rangers at Moose Creek,” Bruce Farling describes his duties while he worked as a Wilderness Ranger at Moose Creek from 1980 to 1988. Bruce, who obtained his degree from the University of Oregon, first became acquainted with Moose Creek Ranger Station in the mid-1970’s, as the policies for managing wilderness were being written after the passage of the Wilderness Act. Later, as a Ranger, Bruce helped to educate users on minimal impact wilderness use, and reveals how the job honed his own wilderness ethic, and his approach to human interaction with pristine lands.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Continue Reading (without disrupting audio playback) » | (more…)

Read Full Post »

The beautiful, pristine Selway River, near Bear Creek, 2010. Photo courtesy Debbie Lee

Play Podcast (click Play button):

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Episode 17 (22:00)

Thank you for joining us for the seventeenth episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” This is a special episode, titled “What is the Greatest Threat to Wilderness?” Debbie Lee, our project coordinator, asked many of the oral history interviewees this question, and she received some surprising and enlightening answers. Among the interviewees in this podcast are Penny Keck, a longtime resident of the Selway-Bitterroot area who managed equipment for the Forest Service, as well as worked with her husband Emil to build and maintain many of the bridges and buildings. We hear from Ed Bloedel, who helped write the first wilderness management plans, Eric Melson and Rob Mason who currently work for the Selway-Bitterroot Foundation, and Warren Miller and Bruce Farling, who worked as Forest Rangers in the Moose Creek district in the 1970’s and 1980’s after the passage of the 1964 Wilderness Act. From these varying perspectives, we hear about the possible future of wilderness areas and their importance in the lives of current and future generations.

Slideshow: Scenic landscapes from the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness at various points during the past century, show how little the protected landscape has changed. In this place, it is possible to view wild land as it once was, and to enjoy the tranquility of recreation in a pristine area.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Continue Reading (without disrupting audio playback) » | (more…)

Read Full Post »