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Archive for the ‘Dennis Baird’ Category

Sign marking the boundary of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

Sign marking the boundary of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

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Episode 39 (08:47)

Thank you for joining us for the thirty-ninth episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. This episode, titled “40th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act” is a radio broadcast produced in September of 2004 by NPR’s Morning Edition. Included are interviews of Doris Milner, Dave Campbell and Dennis Baird. For more information, contact NPR.org.

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Dennis Baird in front of Elk Mountain. Photo courtesy Eric Barker/Lewiston Morning Tribune

Dennis Baird in front of Elk Mountain. Photo courtesy Eric Barker/Lewiston Morning Tribune

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Episode 36 (9:33)

Thank you for joining us for the thirty-sixth episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled “Wilderness Boundaries,” Dennis Baird, the co-leader for the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project, talks about his view of what a wilderness boundary represents, both physically and ideologically.

Dennis Baird attended Michigan State University and the University of Hawaii, and obtained graduate degrees from the University of Michigan and Michigan State University, where he witnessed the very first Earth Day in Ann Arbor. While in high school and college, he traveled extensively in Europe and Southeast Asia, as well as serving for a year in Vietnam. When he finished school, he taught at Southern Illinois University and became involved in conservation, helping to establish the first wilderness area in Illinois: Crab Orchard Wilderness. After moving to Idaho in 1974 to work at the University of Idaho Library, Dennis joined the conservation efforts in establishing both the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. In addition to pursuing his passions for historical preservation at the UI Library, and fine wine at his locally owned business, The Wine Company in Moscow, Dennis continues to advocate for wilderness protection in Idaho.

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