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Archive for the ‘Dick Walker’ Category

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

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Episode 41 (32:06)

Thank you for joining us for the forty-first episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. In this episode, titled “Thirty Miles from Paradise,” we take a look at the community that exists in the Moose Creek Ranger Station. Located deep in the heart of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Moose Creek has housed Forest Service employees, work crews, volunteers, outfitters, visitors, and celebrities. Because it can only be accessed by airplane or thirty miles of non-vehicle trail, Moose Creek Ranger Station tends to foster tight communities within the people who live and work there each season. From the early days of the Forest Service in the 1920’s and 30’s, to the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964, to the present day when the Selway-Bitterroot Foundation organizes volunteer crews to maintain the trails and manage fires, Moose Creek has been one of the central heartbeats of the Selway-Bitterroot area. The various comments presented in this podcast about living and working at Moose Creek give a small glimpse of this unique place.

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Wilderness Photography

Dick Walker

Dick Walker, 2011

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Episode 8 (15:18)

Thank you for joining us for the eighth episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled “Wilderness Photography,” Dick Walker shares some personal experiences with this watershed, and the fish and wildlife of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. Dick began as a wilderness ranger on the Moose Creek Ranger District, starting in 1969. While there, he began applying the results he gained from his Master’s thesis “Photography as an Aid to Wilderness Resource Inventory and Analysis”. During the past 40 years, Dick continued incorporating both aerial and terrestrial photography to capture the seasonal moments: from winter ski trips, to all season backpack and private float trips, always searching for the historical connection, documenting Nature’s ever-changing wilderness ecosystems, as well as identifying misuse or overuse of the Wilderness Resource. Dick has also turned many of his stunning backcountry photos into an art that brings forth the sustainable fragile beauty of the untrammeled wilderness. In addition to serving as a Wilderness Resource Assistant, Dick was a Wilderness Planner and Team Leader on a Congressional Wilderness Study. He’s also a backcountry pilot and is still flying fire patrol, as well as promoting wilderness values while living sustainably.

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