Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Mack Bohrmann’ Category

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

Work Crew at Moose Creek 1979

Play Podcast (click Play button):

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Episode 41 (32:06)

Thank you for joining us for the forty-first episode of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project. In this episode, titled “Thirty Miles from Paradise,” we take a look at the community that exists in the Moose Creek Ranger Station. Located deep in the heart of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Moose Creek has housed Forest Service employees, work crews, volunteers, outfitters, visitors, and celebrities. Because it can only be accessed by airplane or thirty miles of non-vehicle trail, Moose Creek Ranger Station tends to foster tight communities within the people who live and work there each season. From the early days of the Forest Service in the 1920’s and 30’s, to the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964, to the present day when the Selway-Bitterroot Foundation organizes volunteer crews to maintain the trails and manage fires, Moose Creek has been one of the central heartbeats of the Selway-Bitterroot area. The various comments presented in this podcast about living and working at Moose Creek give a small glimpse of this unique place.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Continue Reading (without disrupting audio playback) » | (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The Big Storm

Mack Bohrmann, 2011

Play Podcast (click Play button):

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Episode 11 (10:23)

Thank you for joining us for the eleventh episode of the “Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project.” In this episode, titled “The Big Storm,” we listen to Mack Bohrmann tell the story of a wilderness storm, one of many natural elements that users experience while out in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. Mack was born and raised in Yarmouth, Maine, and moved out to Missoula, Montana in 2004 to attend the University of Montana, where he received a degree in Anthropology and Linguistics, and a minor in Natural Development Studies. Two months later, Mack found himself working for the Montana Conservation Corps, which is an AmeriCorps program, and was leading six people who had never been in the woods before, for six months in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. Stories like Mack’s make up the backbone of the Selway-Bitterroot oral history, as they’re recounted again and again around campfires in the backcountry, and most people who have lived or worked in the wilderness quickly learn the value of telling a good story.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Continue Reading (without disrupting audio playback) » | (more…)

Read Full Post »